Tipton: Time for a Fairer, Flatter and Simpler Tax Code

Apr 15, 2013 Issues: Small Business, Economy and Jobs, Taxes

Encourages constituents to provide feedback on tax reform efforts

WASHINGTON –Today, Rep. Scott Tipton (R-CO) called for comprehensive tax reform to make the tax code “fairer, flatter and simpler” for American families and small businesses.

“To prepare for Tax Day, Americans will spend 6 billion hours trying to decipher the 4 million word tax code and pay $168 billion in compliance costs. This is before even paying the taxes they owe which, incidentally, will be $1000 more for the average family thanks to the President’s tax increase this year,” said Tipton. “The tax code can be flatter, fairer, and simpler. Through comprehensive reform we can create a system that works for taxpayers provide Americans with the opportunity to spend more time with their families, keep more of their hard-earned paychecks, and give businesses the ability to devote their resources to creating jobs, instead of filling out endless paperwork.”

Small businesses spend 65 percent more on compliance costs than large companies.  According to the National Federation of Independent Businesses, tax issues make up four out of the ten top problems small businesses face.

This was the sense during a recent economic listening tour Tipton conducted in the 3rd District that included meetings with constituents, local officials and small business owners in Pueblo, Steamboat, Craig, Alamosa, Durango, Cortez, Montrose, Grand Junction, Meeker, Rye, Gypsum  and Dove Creek.  The purpose of the meetings, town halls, business tours and briefings was to identify the top challenges standing in the way of job creation in the district. 

“To encourage the innovation, growth and entrepreneurship needed to create new jobs, the consensus among job creators in my district is that Washington must reform the tax code,” Tipton said. “The tax system is forcing small businesses, many of which are struggling in this economy, to devote their limited resources toward compliance with the bloated federal tax code.  These resources could be used to expand and create jobs. Instead, the government is standing in the way and making it difficult to keep the doors open, let alone create new jobs.” 

When first created in 1903, the U.S. tax code was 400 pages long. Since then, the tax code has exploded to 70,000 pages. This includes one of the simplest tax forms, the 46 page-long 1040EZ form.

“I encourage my constituents to take a look at Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp’s discussion draft legislation on tax reform, and invite them to contact my office to provide feedback. In addition to simplifying the tax code, Chairman Camp’s proposal aims to initiate comprehensive reform by closing loopholes to ensure that everyone pays a fair share, protect taxpayers by providing oversight over Wall Street, and create a tax system that makes American businesses more competitive globally and right here at home,” said Tipton.

To learn more about Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp’s discussion draft legislation and House Republican tax reform efforts visit the House Ways and Means Committee visit: www.gop.gov/taxreform.

Constituents are encouraged to provide feedback on the discussion draft to Congressman Tipton by emailing scott.tipton@mail.house.gov.